?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Mum and I were in Tesco on Saturday when the fire alarm went off. Everyone ignored it, as British people do when we hear alarms, but it turned out to be real and we had to evacuate the building. No actual fire though; people were allowed back in after about ten minutes. Still, a bit more excitement than we usually get at the supermarket.

Interestingly enough, the alarm sounded just after we'd selected a birthday present for Kat. Was this Tesco's way of disapproving of our choice?

Oh great and wise Tesco, what do you think I should buy my brother's girlfriend for her 21st birthday?

(Also, I can't help but wonder how the clean up of trolleys would go after an event like this. How long do staff give people to return before they start clearing the abandoned trolleys away? Do they put the items straight back on the shelves or collect them all up to do later? What about frozen food? So many questions!)

Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
tyasante
May. 26th, 2008 01:33 pm (UTC)
Ah, the Gods of Tesco (pron: Teh-Sk'ooooooh) disapprove of everything. They would rather all bought their Tesco Value range since it is cheap, and can be sacrificed more easily at their alters of Self-Checkout. Mayhap you angered the Great Gods of Tesco, for the present was not of Tesco's brand...

It's comments like these that make me realise I've been reading far too much about Ancient Greek Mythology and not focusing enough on my bastard essay ...
after_thought16
May. 26th, 2008 07:37 pm (UTC)
Does anyone else find that the self-checkout seems to attract morons...
bluegoo0
May. 27th, 2008 06:40 pm (UTC)
Yes ^^; certainly I use them!

I have never quite got the hang of the sacrificial self-checkout ritual. The altar tends towards bad omens such as finding my sacrifices invisible...
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

Latest Month

September 2018
S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30      

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Keri Maijala